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This elephant blockprint on silk is just as lovely colorful & vivid as we think whole India is #IloveIndia

This elephant blockprint on silk is just as lovely colorful & vivid as we think whole India is #IloveIndia

On the way from the Ecoloove factory we spotted this mobile toy shop #social entrepreneurship #ecosan

On the way from the Ecoloove factory we spotted this mobile toy shop #social entrepreneurship #ecosan

We need to pee!

We need to pee!

Mobile toilet - weird? Proof of concept - mobile grocery shops going from house 2 house. Practical!

Ecosan toilets supported by UNICEF - unhygienic

The ecosan toilet block is situated at Kigali highway in Rwanda. A local worker is keeping the toilet block clean. He is paid by the district. They get a little money from the users, who pay per visit. Paying for this is a new culture in Rwanda, so not many people pay, according to Mr. Bitunguranye, Acting Executive Secretary of the elected District Council.

Unhygienic ecosan toilet

Unhygienic ecosan toilet. Flies from the excreta can still spread disease since the slabs are open.

We visit the Ecosan bloc on the road opposite the district offices. From a distance it looks OK, with a wash basin, soap and a tippy tap in place. But when entering inside the toilet room:
- I see light from the collection chamber though the slab. In fact the collections chambers are 120 litre open drop boxes that are not linked with the slab. This means that flies from the excreta can still spread diseases. Writes Dick de Jong on his blog 

“Maybe construction teams require more training”

The comments of the unhygienic ecosan toilets from Dick de Jong, IRC (Netherlands) regarding inspection inside the toilets gives a shock to Mr. Jackson Mugisha, Environment Facilitator of the Ministry of Local Government and Johnson Nkusi, CEO of the Rwandan Environmental NGO Forum.

Jackson is grateful that Mr Jong point this out to him. He says: “I have to send the Ministry of Infrastructure people here to check your observations that these are not hygienic ecological toilets. It may be that the construction teams require more training. Maybe all the technical teams require more training”.

This article is based on a blogpost by Dick de Jong from 12th August 2011, IRC (Netherlands). 

 
Book about the lack of toilets and examples of solutions: The Big Necessity by Rose George.
"In the early twenty-first century, when surgery can be done microscopically and human achievement seems limitless, 2.6 billion people lack the most basic thing that human dignity requires. Four in ten people in the world have no toilet. They must do their business instead on roadsides, in the bushes, wherever they can. Yet human feces in water supplies contribute to one in ten of the world’s communicable diseases. A child dies from diarrhoea – usually brought on by fecal-contaminated food or water – every 15 seconds.
Meanwhile, the western world luxuriates in flush toilets; in toilets that play music or can check blood pressure, where the flush is a thoughtless thing, and anything that can go down a sewer – nappies, motorbikes, goldfish – does. In these times, Japanese women routinely use a device called a Flush Princess to mask the sound of their bodily functions; while in China millions of people happily use public toilets with no doors. The Big Necessity – as one Mumbai toilet builder called the toilet – is the account of my travels through the profoundly intriguing but stupidly neglected world of the disposal of human waste, which houses characters like Jack Sim, founder of the World Toilet Organization; Wang Ming Ying, who is attempting to alleviate environmental devastation and deforestation in China by persuading rural Chinese to install biogas digesters, which produce cooking gas from human feces; Dr. Bindeshwar Pathak, whose NGO Sulabh has built half a million toilets in India, as well as the world’s only museum of toilets; and the flushers of London and New York’s sewers, who scoff at roaches but hate rats nearly as much as they hate congealed cooking fat and tri-ply toilet paper.”
Text: rosegeorge.com.

 

Book about the lack of toilets and examples of solutions: The Big Necessity by Rose George.

"In the early twenty-first century, when surgery can be done microscopically and human achievement seems limitless, 2.6 billion people lack the most basic thing that human dignity requires. Four in ten people in the world have no toilet. They must do their business instead on roadsides, in the bushes, wherever they can. Yet human feces in water supplies contribute to one in ten of the world’s communicable diseases. A child dies from diarrhoea – usually brought on by fecal-contaminated food or water – every 15 seconds.

Meanwhile, the western world luxuriates in flush toilets; in toilets that play music or can check blood pressure, where the flush is a thoughtless thing, and anything that can go down a sewer – nappies, motorbikes, goldfish – does. In these times, Japanese women routinely use a device called a Flush Princess to mask the sound of their bodily functions; while in China millions of people happily use public toilets with no doors. The Big Necessity – as one Mumbai toilet builder called the toilet – is the account of my travels through the profoundly intriguing but stupidly neglected world of the disposal of human waste, which houses characters like Jack Sim, founder of the World Toilet Organization; Wang Ming Ying, who is attempting to alleviate environmental devastation and deforestation in China by persuading rural Chinese to install biogas digesters, which produce cooking gas from human feces; Dr. Bindeshwar Pathak, whose NGO Sulabh has built half a million toilets in India, as well as the world’s only museum of toilets; and the flushers of London and New York’s sewers, who scoff at roaches but hate rats nearly as much as they hate congealed cooking fat and tri-ply toilet paper.”

Text: rosegeorge.com.

Ecoloove transport from India to Sweden

We’re going to ship an Ecoloove to Stockholm, Sweden. It’s for an exhibition. But there’re only container routes for India-Gothenburg!? Will probably have to make a little truck road trip to Gothenburg and back..

We love this informatics poster explaining how genius ecological sanitation (#ecosan) is, wsscc.org